Iran’s religious dress code, contributing to rise of Multiple Sclerosis among women

23 May

Iranian women are forced to cover themselves head to toe, thus reducing their exposure to sunlight

In Iran, women being forced to abide by the country’s religious dress code is a serious matter, especially when you look at the potential impact on their health.

According to a new study, Iran’s Islamic dress code for women is believed to be a contributing factor to the skyrocketing increase in the rate of the deadly Multiple Sclerosis (MS) disease among Iranian women. The reason being that it reduces their body’s exposure to sunlight, an important source of Vitamin D.

The study by Oxford University found that between 1989 and 2005, the rate of MS among women in Tehran increased by 700%.

In Isfahan the rate of MS among women increased by 300% between 2005 – 2009.

As noted lack of sunlight is believed to be one of numerous contributing factors to the rising rate of MS in Iran. Others could include “genetic dispositions” among Iranians.

Orthodox Jewish women in Israel who completely cover their bodies and get little exposure to sunlight could also face the same risk. But unlike Iran, no one is forcing them to dress this way.

All religions are holy. But I think it should be up to people to decide what they wear, and not to be forced to dress in a certain way, especially when it could risk their health. It also tramples on their human right to choose.

clerosis has skyrocketed in Tehran, increasing almost sevenfold between 1989 and 2005. In Iran’s central province of Isfahan, the incidence nearly tripled from 2005 to 2009. Now Oxford University researchers suggest, for the first time, that the 1979 Iranian Revolution may deserve some of the blame for the extraordinary jump.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-is-causing-irans-spike-in-ms-cases-36463584/#yCBiKUeKOtY0VQsl.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Multiple sclerosis has skyrocketed in Tehran, increasing almost sevenfold between 1989 and 2005. In Iran’s central province of Isfahan, the incidence nearly tripled from 2005 to 2009. Now Oxford University researchers suggest, for the first time, that the 1979 Iranian Revolution may deserve some of the blame for the extraordinary jump.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-is-causing-irans-spike-in-ms-cases-36463584/#yCBiKUeKOtY0VQsl.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Multiple sclerosis has skyrocketed in Tehran, increasing almost sevenfold between 1989 and 2005. In Iran’s central province of Isfahan, the incidence nearly tripled from 2005 to 2009. Now Oxford University researchers suggest, for the first time, that the 1979 Iranian Revolution may deserve some of the blame for the extraordinary jump.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-is-causing-irans-spike-in-ms-cases-36463584/#yCBiKUeKOtY0VQsl.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Multiple sclerosis has skyrocketed in Tehran, increasing almost sevenfold between 1989 and 2005. In Iran’s central province of Isfahan, the incidence nearly tripled from 2005 to 2009. Now Oxford University researchers suggest, for the first time, that the 1979 Iranian Revolution may deserve some of the blame for the extraordinary jump.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/what-is-causing-irans-spike-in-ms-cases-36463584/#yCBiKUeKOtY0VQsl.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: